13 NOV / 2014 0

The 180 Watch: LSAT Timing Simplified

Here at LSAT Freedom, we often survey the LSAT landscape to find other LSAT- and law school-related tips and advice for our readers.  Every so often, we come across products that might help LSAT test-takers or aspiring law school students (like the best laptops for law school).

For this post, we decided to zone in on the 180 Watch, an analog wristwatch designed for the LSAT.  The 180 Watch was founded by Harvard classmates Daniel Valenti and Matt Thomas.  We caught up with Daniel and asked him a few questions about the 180 Watch.  He was more than generous in obliging . . . .The 180 Watch

Interview with The 180 Watch

LSAT Freedom: What is the difference between the 180 Watch and a regular analog watch?  Why is it better?

180 Watch (Daniel): The 180Watch is a purpose-built watch specifically for high-achieving LSAT students. We have designed it to conform to the rules of the test while being as simple as possible to use. Unlike other watches, there is no hour hand to worry about, no second hand that keeps ticking beyond control, and no bezels to rotate or crowns to pull out and set. The 180Watch simply has a start/stop button and a reset button. With one push of a button, the second and minute hands automatically return to zero. Test day is stressful enough; knowing exactly how much time you have left in each section should not be one of your concerns.

LSAT Freedom: Why did you create the 180 Watch?

180 Watch: As an LSAT student, I realized how important timing is for the test. One extra minute on a logic game, I found out, can go a long way. Further, I was surprised how fast the LSAT moved between sections – not exactly a ton of time to pull out the crown of my watch, adjust it to zero, and wait for the second hand to tick back around. Overall, I was spending too much mental energy figuring out how much time I had left, when those precious few brain cells were much-needed elsewhere (trust me). I searched around on the internet, and couldn’t find a simple solution that conformed to the test rules, so I created 180Watch.The 180 Watch

LSAT Freedom: How does the 180 Watch work? 

180 Watch: 180Watch is simple. There are two buttons and two watch hands. The large minute hand sweeps across the dia,l and the second hand is in the small inset circle. One button starts/stops timing, the other automatically sets both hands to zero. When using the 180Watch, you know exactly how much time is remaining.

LSAT Freedom: What purpose does each knob on the right serve?

180 Watch: There are only two buttons – a start/stop button, and a reset button. That’s it! (There is a knob, but it is of no use).

LSAT Freedom: Why does the 180 Watch have extended tick marks at the 8-minute intervals?

180 Watch: This feature helps test-takers gauge their progress on logic games. A common goal among top test-takers is to complete each game within 8 minutes, so a quick glance at the 180Watch instantly tells you how far along you are.

LSAT Freedom: How is the 180 Watch different than other LSAT watches?

180 Watch: The 180Watch is not for everyone – it’s the premium LSAT watch. We have designed this watch from start-to-finish specifically for the test. There are other solutions, but none that work as simply and as precisely as the 180Watch. We also encourage people to see if other watches allow for resetting of the second hand. The 180Watch is for students who value precision and ease-of-use and recognize the value of even one extra point on the test.The 180 Watch

LSAT Freedom: Has the Law School Admission Council approved the 180 Watch for use during an officially-administered LSAT?

180 Watch: LSAC has confirmed that the 180Watch conforms to its rules of no digital watches.

LSAT Freedom: How much does the 180 Watch cost?

180 Watch: The 180Watch is $59.99

LSAT Freedom: If someone has a question about the 180 Watch, how can he/she contact you?

180 Watch: Please email us at orders@180watch.com – we’d love to hear from you!

LSAT Freedom: Do you have any plans for future products?

180 Watch: We are always open to ideas that help people realize their goals. We aren’t currently building anything else for test-takers, but we’re always open to new ideas!


Once again, if you’re interested in the 180 Watch, visit their website.

 

11 NOV / 2014 0

4 Simple But Powerful LSAT Prep Strategies

Topics: LSAT Prep, LSAT Tips

In this post, I’ll share four ways that students can improve the effectiveness of their LSAT study efforts. The LSAT, perhaps more so than other standardized tests, can seem like some sort of an IQ test that can’t be studied for. The simple fact is that you can study for it, and with focused practice, you’ll improve.

But, there are certainly better and worse ways to approach your study efforts. The four tips we’ll discuss today are:

-Make a strategic, customized study plan

-Drop the belief that any portion of the exam can’t be studied for

-Understand that you only learn by doing

-Use official practice materials

1. Make a strategic, customized study plan

I often use the word “strategic” when talking about academic and test prep planning, and at its core, it just means that you make intentional choices about what to do and not to do, after gathering some relevant facts about the situation, while understanding that there are tradeoffs in how you spend your time.

So, taking an LSAT prep class because that’s what everyone seems to do, or purchasing an LSAT prep book, opening it up, and beginning to read through it, may be helpful ways to begin to learn about the test, but they aren’t strategic approaches to building a study plan.

LSAT Prep Strategies

If you are making a strategic plan, you should follow a four-step process:

a. Set a goal

Start by understanding your target score, working back from your target law schools. Only with a target score in mind will you be able to measure your progress and know how much farther you have to go.

b. Gather facts about the situation

When preparing for the LSAT, the facts you need to know address questions like:

-What’s on the LSAT?

-How much do I already know about how to answer questions in the reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, and logical reasoning sections?

-What study options exist? Classes, books, videos, tutors, etc.?

-What study options am I most comfortable with based on previous prep experiences?

-How much time do I have to study?

-How much money can I spend on LSAT prep?

Answering some of these questions requires reading about the test on the Law School Admission Council website, and should involve taking an official practice test to measure your in-going skill level.

c. Develop alternative prep options

Alternative prep options will address materials, focus of your study efforts, time, and cost.

A prep class works for many people. But, if you’re really struggling to achieve an average score, or if you want to hit that 90th percentile top tier score, it’s probably not for you. Private tutoring is the ultimate in customized help, but it’s expensive. Do you tend to be very self-motivated and easily avoid procrastination? If so, self-study might actually be best. If you’re comfortable with technology, online LSAT prep options are often a good choice.

If you score in the 90th percentile on one section of your practice test, but in the 30th on another, you may want to consider building your plan with a clear focus on that particular section. With the LSAT, many students fear the logic games (i.e., analytical reasoning section). But, with the right allocation of time, most students can get much more comfortable and confident with that section.

The point here is that by simply considering the various options available to you and thinking them through, you’ll be able to come up with a rough roadmap for your study plan that works well for you.

d. Make a specific plan

Once you’ve determined, roughly, what materials you’ll use, where you’ll focus, what support you’ll get, etc., it’s time to write out a specific plan. That plan should be finished a few days before you take the exam. A three-month study plan seems to be reasonable for many people. It should include frequency of study sessions, location of study sessions, frequency of practice tests to measure progress, and more. It should be very specific, and something you will hold yourself to following.

Developing an effective, strategic, customized study plan is not easy, but it can be powerful. It’s one of the main themes of MyGuru’s new book, 99th Percentile: A Roadmap for Achieving Drastic Performance Improvement on Standardized Tests.

2. Drop the belief that any portion of the exam can’t be studied for

One of MyGuru’s best tutors, a person who has scored a 180 on official LSAT exams several times, been contracted to write official LSAT questions by LSAC, and tutored hundreds of students, tells me time and time again – you can prepare for and learn how to score well on the LSAT. It is not fundamentally a test of innate intelligence or aptitude.

Once you drop the belief that the LSAT is in some way an IQ test, you’ll be able to focus fully on your study efforts and get more out of the time you spend studying.

3. Understand that you only learn by doing

We learn new things when synapses in our brain are formed as a result of actively thinking and wrestling with a subject. If we aren’t actively engaged in something, it’s much more difficult to learn it or remember it. Just seeing or reading is much less effective than doing.LSAT Prep Strategies

So, if you really don’t understand a particular strategy used to answer LSAT questions, you can start by reading about the strategy, but you need to quickly transition to actually doing LSAT practice problems. The analytical reasoning section is a great example of this. You will improve your score in this section only be actively doing practice problems, not by reading about how to do them. It’s as simple as that.

4. Use official practice materials

In the past, MyGuru has been contracted by test prep companies that write LSAT test prep materials to provide editing and review services. So, we’ve been paid to review questions, make sure they make sense, spot errors, and ensure they align with the standards set forth by LSAC.  In other words, we’ve been hired to answer the question, Do our materials provide the same type and quality of questions students will see on the actual LSAT exam? The answer, unfortunately, is often a resounding No.

Test prep companies who are in the business of creating materials need to have new sets of materials every year, and are constantly trying to keep up with subtle or not so subtle changes in writing style or substance that the folks writing the official materials might introduce. Sometimes they do a good job, sometimes they end up being pretty far off.

This is a big problem. When you took the ACT or SAT, you may have experienced a practice test from a major prep company that, while it seemed to have the major components of the official exam, was significantly easier or harder. So, you either gain undue confidence, or your confidence takes a hit unnecessarily. In an even worse case, you begin studying concepts that you saw in the prep material that isn’t going to be on the actual exam. Now, you’re wasting time and filling your brain with unnecessary information.

There is no substitute for official LSAT materials when studying for the LSAT.

About the Author

Mark Skoskiewicz holds a B.S. in Finance from Indiana University and an MBA from Northwestern University, and is the founder of MyGuru, a private 1-1 tutoring and test prep company based in Chicago, with locations across the U.S. Private LSAT tutoring is a key focus area for MyGuru.

MyGuru’s goal is to empower students with ideas, insights, and advice about how the right mindset, effective study habits, and strategic thinking can unleash large increases in grades, test scores, and academic and professional success.

7 NOV / 2014 0

How To Determine Your Legal Specialization

Topics: Law School

One of the biggest decisions that you will have to make during your legal career is choosing your area of specialization. Law schools do not expect you to know the kind of law you want to pursue upon entry. In fact, most students wait until they matriculate and search for jobs before they make that decision. However, it is always good to have a focus in mind to prepare you for your future career.

Law school will arm you with the knowledge and skills for you to succeed in your career, but it will also help you explore the possibilities that are available to you. You can select a few electives during your latter two years in law school to get an idea of what you are interested in. Once you finish the core curriculum in law, you are given the freedom to choose law school programs in accordance to your chosen field of practice.How to Determine Your Legal Specialization

While your career objectives and interests will guide your decisions, it pays to research credible resources, including lawyers who have practiced in that field for a period of time. They can give you a glimpse of their daily responsibilities and lives and can even serve as a personal contact for prospective jobs in that special area.

If you’re interested in practicing law, but don’t know what you want to specialize in, here are a few ideas:

Criminal Law. Criminal law revolves around the prosecution of any person who committed a criminal act. Lawyers ensure the protection of the rights of the victims, as well as the accused. There are a variety of different manners in which you can practice criminal law whether as a government lawyer on the state or federal level or any number of other criminal law-related jobs.

Corporate Law. Otherwise known as business law, corporate law focuses on business enterprises and organizations. You help ensure that the administration and management of business affairs is in accordance with state and federal laws. Your responsibilities will cover various topics, including mergers, acquisitions, shareholder rights, reorganizations, or disputes between companies. 

Entertainment Law. Entertainment law focuses on legal services, rights, and royalties rendered to the media in the arts, film, television, or sports. This is an interesting area of law for many people because of the subject matter involved and the variety of sizes and styles of clients ranging from big corporations to individuals.

International Law. International law is a broader concept, which represents the rights and principles of the nations and states. This has two divisions – private and public. Public international law largely applies to customary tenets of international law and treaties entered into by two consenting states or groups. Generally, this work heavily involves the government or international institutions. On the other hand, private international law practice can offer opportunities in law firms or multinational corporations.

Patent Law.  Patent law involves the protection of the creations of inventors and the encouragement of innovation. Lawyers who will prosecute patents must be specially-licensed and have some background in scientific study.                      

If you’re still unsure of what to specialize in, schedule a consultation with the InGenius Prep law school admissions experts today.

This article was written by an admissions expert at InGenius Prep.

29 OCT / 2014 0

LSAT Logic Games Practice – One Sample LSAT Logic Game Explained

Students fret over the LSAT Logic Games section.  Some students simply can’t crack this section.  For others, the light bulb goes on, but they never finish the section in time.  No matter what difficulty the LSAT Logic Games section presents to you, it is safe to say it involves a unique challenge many students have never experienced.

Nevertheless, this challenge can be overcome with a simple, straightforward approach.  If you can master this approach and learn how to attack the common LSAT Logic Games questions this section will become the easiest section on the exam.LSAT Logic Games

How is that possible?  Logic Games are no different than puzzles.  However, what makes them easier than puzzles is that a Logic Game gives you all the information you need to answer its corresponding questions.  This fact yields two strategic advantages.

First, you don’t need to look elsewhere for critical pieces of the puzzle.  Everything you need is right in front of you.

Second, because you have all the information you need, the game and the questions become predictable.  Not only can you predict how certain scenarios will play out in a given game, you can use an answer to one question to predict an answer to another question.  On an exam where time is of the essence, these advantages are monumentally critical.

To gain these advantages, however, you need to focus on processing and understanding the information that is on the page.  That is the key to succeeding at Logic Games.  You have to synthesize the information quickly and effectively.

The best method for processing the information in a given Logic Game and, then, answering the questions that follow is to diagram the Game’s scenarios and its rules so that you have a visual picture of what is and is not allowed.  This picture will help you answer the questions more quickly by eliminating possibilities that do not fit your pre-determined diagram and helping you visually examine whether the remaining answers in each question “fit” the diagram on your page.

In this blog post, we will examine one sample (i.e., made-up) Logic Game.  We will diagram the game and its rules.  We will then answer each question, explain why each correct answer is right, and explain why each incorrect answer is wrong.

The more you become familiar with diagramming LSAT Logic Games, the more you will understand them on the exam, and the more quickly you will be able to analyze the problem and arrive at the correct answer.

Sample LSAT Logic Game

Let’s look at our sample LSAT Logic Game:


A car dealership employee must park seven cars.  The cars are labeled A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.  There are seven different consecutive parking spaces available for these cars.  The parking spaces are numbered one through seven.  Only one car can be parked in each space.  The parking of the cars in the spaces is subject to the following rules:

  • A and C must be parked in consecutive spaces.
  • C must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E.
  • A must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G.
  • If E is not parked in the fourth space, then D must be parked in the fourth space.
  • F and G cannot be parked in consecutively-numbered spaces.

 

1. Which of the following could be a possible list of the cars in the order that they are parked?

(A) ACDEFBG
(B) BFAECGD
(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

2. If car A is parked in the third space, then which of the following must be true?

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.
(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

3. Which of the following could be true?

(A) F is parked in the sixth space.
(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

4. If B is parked in the third space, then each of the following could be true EXCEPT:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.
(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

5. If F is parked in the seventh space, then which of the following must be parked in the first space?

(A) B
(B) A
(C) D
(D) C
(E) E


 

As explained above, the best method for answering these questions is to diagram the rules above so that you have a visual picture of what is and is not allowed.  Thus, before proceeding to or even looking at the questions, we will create a diagram that illustrates the seven spaces and which cars can be parked in each space.  This diagram will help you answer the questions more quickly by eliminating possibilities that do not fit your pre-determined diagram and helping you visually examine whether the remaining answers in each question “fit” your diagram.

First, draw a diagram that looks like this:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car               

This diagram shows, as the problem above states, “seven different consecutive parking spaces” that are “numbered one through seven.”  Now, we will write down and diagram the rules for the parking of the cars.  We have five rules, so let’s examine each one individually:

Rule 1: A and C must be parked in consecutive spaces.

This rule is straightforward: A and C must be side-by-side in our diagram.  Note that it does not say where in the diagram they must be.  So simply list your first “rule” as follows underneath your diagram:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car               

Rule 1: AC


Note that the rule states “A and C must be parked in consecutive spaces.”  That does not mean C must be parked after A, or that A must precede C.  The rule is less strict than that.  It states only that they must be parked in “consecutive” spaces.  Thus, either can be parked before the other so long as they are parked consecutively.  In other words, under Rule 1, the following order is possible:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car A C          

Rule 1: AC


So is this one:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car     C A      

Rule 1: AC


In both scenarios, they are parked in “consecutive” parking spaces.  So, after examining our first rule, your diagram should look like this:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA


Let’s move on to the next rule:

Rule 2: C must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E.

This rule reveals much more about our parking possibilities because it helps us eliminate a parking space for both C and E.  Let’s diagram it:


 

Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C


Because C must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E, E could not possibly be parked in space 7 because there is no higher-numbered space where C could be parked.  Thus, let’s make a note of that rule in space 7:


 

Space 2 3 4 5 6 7(E)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C


Also, because C must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E, C could not possibly be parked in space 1 because there is no lower-numbered space where E could be parked.  Thus, let’s make a note of that rule in space 1:


 

Space 1(C) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C


By writing in C with a strikethrough in space 1 and E with a strikethrough in space 7, we will be reminded, as we proceed through the questions that C cannot be parked in the first space, and E cannot be parked in the last space. 

In addition, notice that Rule 2 simply states that C must be parked in a “higher-numbered space” than E.  It does not state that C and E must be parked in “consecutive” spaces like A and C.  Nor does it state that C must be parked immediately after E.  It merely states that C, wherever it is parked, must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E.  Thus, without considering any other rules for now, E could be parked in space 2, and C could be parked in space 6 as shown:


 

Space 1(C) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E)
Car   E       C  

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C


Or E could be parked in space 3 and C in space 4:


 

Space 1(C) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E)
Car     E C      

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C


As long as C is parked in a higher-numbered space than E, we have complied with Rule 2.  Let’s move on to the next rule:

Rule 3: A must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G.

This rule is very similar to Rule 2, only it requires that one car (A) be parked in a lower-numbered, rather than higher-numbered, space.  Also, like Rule 2, it helps us eliminate a space for the parking of two cars, which, in this case, are A and G.  Before we proceed, however, let’s write in our third rule:


 

Space 1(C) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G


Now, because A must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G, A could not possibly be parked in space 7 because there is no higher-numbered space where G could be parked.  Thus, let’s make a note of that rule in space 7:


 

Space 1(C) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G


Also, because A must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G, G could not possibly be parked in space 1 because there is no lower-numbered space where A could be parked.  Thus, let’s make a note of that rule in space 1:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G


By writing in G with a strikethrough in space 1 and A with a strikethrough in space 7, we will be reminded, as we proceed through the questions that G cannot be parked in the first space, and A cannot be parked in the last space.

In addition, notice that Rule 2 simply states that A must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G.  It does not state that A and G must be parked in “consecutive” spaces like A and C.  Nor does it state that A must be parked immediately before G.  It merely states that A, wherever it is parked, must be parked in a lower-numbered space than G.  Thus, without considering any other rules for now, A could be parked in space 2 and G in space 6 as shown:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car   A       G  

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G


Or A could be parked in space 3 and G in space 4:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car     A G      

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G


As long as A is parked in a lower-numbered space than G, we have complied with Rule 3.  On to the next rule . . .

Rule 4: If E is not parked in the fourth space, then D must be parked in the fourth space.

Like Rules 2 and 3, this rule helps us narrow down which cars can be parked in which spaces.  In this case, this rule only allows E or D to be parked in space 4.  Let’s write in our rule first (this is optional, since we’ll make a note of this in the actual diagram, as shown in the next step):


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4


Then let’s make a note in the actual diagram that only E or D can be parked in space 4:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4


Let’s proceed to the last rule:

Rule 5: G and F cannot be parked in consecutively numbered spaces.

This rule is the opposite of Rule 1.  Whereas Rule 1 requires that two cars (A and C) be parked in consecutive spaces, this rule prohibits two cars (G and F) from being parked in consecutive spaces.  It makes no difference that the phrase “consecutively numbered” is used here, but the term “consecutive” is used in Rule 1.  They effectively mean the same thing.  Also, notice that the rule does not specify any sequence, such as a rule that G cannot be parked immediately before F.  Rather, it prohibits all scenarios in which G and F are “parked in consecutively numbered spaces.”  Thus, let’s write in our final rule:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4

Rule 5: GF, FG


Notice also that the rule does not state anything regarding which car (G or F) can be parked before the other.  That doesn’t matter.  It merely states that they cannot be parked consecutively.  Thus, G can be parked before F but not immediately before F:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car   G     F    

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4

Rule 5: GF, FG


And vice versa: F can be parked before G but not immediately before G.  Either can be parked before the other so long as they are not parked consecutively.


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car   F     G    

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4

Rule 5: GF, FG


Now that we’ve diagrammed our rules and created a working chart of the parking order with a minimum set of guidelines as to which cars can be parked in which spaces, the most important thing you can do before proceeding to the questions is to infer additional rules based on the ones set forth above.  Any additional rules you can infer will create shortcuts you can exploit when you answer the questions.  These shortcuts will save you valuable time.

In this particular game, one way to create additional rules is to look at your diagram and rules and determine which rules allow you to create sequences.  In other words, which rules can you combine to form a sequence of three or more cars?


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Rule 1: AC, CA

Rule 2: E – C

Rule 3: A – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4.

Rule 5: GF, FG


Glancing at your rules, you should notice the following:

Rules 1 and 2 (a) both affect C, (b) affect three different cars, and (c) can be combined to form a longer sequence.

Rules 1 and 3 (b) both affect A, (b) affect three different cars, and (c) can be combined to form a longer sequence.

These Rules allow you to create sequences of cars that you can use as shortcuts when determining which parking arrangements are possible or not possible.

For example, Rule 1 requires that A and C be parked consecutively.  Rule 2 requires that C be parked in a higher-numbered space than E.  Thus, we know that, wherever C and A are parked, E must be parked before them.  In addition, wherever E is parked, we know that C and A must be parked after E.  So, this sequence would look like this:

E – AC/CA

E must be parked in a lower-numbered space (or before) the consecutive parking of A and C.  This sequence allows us to map out, with relatively good precision, the parking order of three cars.  Whenever a question or answer places E, A, or C in one of the seven spaces, we can use the sequence above to predict (to some extent) where the other two cars might be parked.

We can do the same thing with Rules 1 and 3 and add to this sequence.  Rule 1 requires that A and C be parked consecutively.  Rule 3 requires that A be parked in a lower-numbered space than G.  Thus, we know that, wherever C and A are parked (which, again, must be consecutively), G must be parked after them.  In addition, wherever G is parked, we know that C and A must be parked before G.  So, this sequence would look like this:

AC/CA – G

A and C (again, parked consecutively) must be parked in lower-numbered spaces than G.  This sequence also allows us to map out, with relatively good precision, the parking order of three cars.  Whenever a question or answer or answer places either A, C, or G in one of the seven spaces, we can use the sequence above to predict (to some extent) where the other two cars might be parked.

Furthermore, if we combine the sequences, we will have a larger sequence that affects four cars:

E – AC/CA – G

In other words, E must be parked in a lower-numbered space than (i.e., before) the consecutive parking of A and C, which must be parked in lowered-numbered spaces than (i.e., before) G.  This larger sequence also allows us to map out, with relatively good precision, the parking of four cars.  Whenever a question or answer or answer places E, A, C, or G in one of the seven spaces, we can use the sequence above to predict (again, to some extent) where the other three cars will be parked.

So, because we have effectively combined Rules 1, 2, and 3 into a sequence, let’s replace Rules 1, 2, and 3 underneath our diagram with this sequence:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Sequence: E – AC/CA – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4.

Rule 5: GF, FG


Why eliminate three rules, replace it with this sequence, and make it special?  Because it affects four cars.  Remember: time is critical on this exam.  When you are dealing with a question and looking to eliminate answers, considering how a sequence that implicates four cars affects your given question and answers will help you eliminate answers quicker than dealing with a rule that only implicates two cars.  Furthermore, when – through inference – you can simplify your rules, do so!  One combined sequence is better to interpret and apply than three individual rules.

A few more things before we proceed to the questions.

First, our new Sequence helps us write in some additional rules on our diagram.  The Sequence requires that E be parked in a lower-numbered space than A, C, and G.   None of the latter three cars can ever be parked before E.  We have already noted in our chart that neither G nor C can ever be parked in space 1:


 

Space 1(C) (G) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Now, we can also note that A can never be parked in space 1:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Why?  Because, according to our Sequence, none of these three cars – G, C, or A – can ever be parked in lower-numbered spaces than E.  Thus, placing any of them in space 1 would violate that rule because there is no lower-numbered space in which E can be parked.

The Sequence also requires that G must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E, A, and C.  Thus, none of the latter three cars can ever be parked in higher-numbered spaces than G.  We have already noted in our diagram that neither A nor E can ever be parked in space 7:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A)
Car              

Now, we can also note that C can never be parked in space 7:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A) (C)
Car              

Why?  For the same reasons as our previous example.  According to our Sequence, none of these three cars – E, C, or A – can ever be parked in higher-numbered spaces than G.  Thus, placing any of them in space 7 would violate that rule because there is no higher-numbered space in which G can be parked.

These are not the only additional notations we can infer and write into on our diagram.  Let’s look again at our Sequence:

E – AC/CA – G

If E must be parked in a lower-numbered space than A, C, and G, that means it must be parked in a higher-numbered space than three cars.  This means parking E in a space that precedes fewer than three cars would violate our Sequence.  For instance, parking E in space 5 would violate our Sequence because only two spaces follow space 5, and there are three cars that must be parked after E:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5 6 7(E) (A) (C)
Car         E    

So, based on this information, we should pencil in the spaces in which E cannot be parked.  To do this, cross out the spaces that do not precede three or more spaces.  Looking at our chart, we should prohibit E from being parked in spaces 5, 6, and 7 (which we’ve already noted):


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car              

Parking E in any of these spaces would violate our Sequence because there would not be a sufficient number of spaces (we need three of them) in which to park the three cars (A, C, and G) that, according to our Sequence, must follow E in some fashion.

Just as we did for E, we can do the same for G.  Let’s look again at our Sequence:

E – AC/CA – G

If G must be parked in a higher-numbered space than E, A, and C, that means it must be parked in a higher-numbered space than three cars.  This means parking G in a space that follows fewer than three spaces would violate our Sequence.  For instance, parking G in space 3 would violate our Sequence because only two spaces precede space 3, and there are three cars that must be parked in lower-numbered spaces than G:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2 3 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car     G        

So, based on this information, we should write in the spaces in which G cannot be parked.  To do this, cross out the spaces that do not follow three or more spaces.  Looking at our chart, we should prohibit G from being parked in spaces 1 (which we’ve already noted), 2, and 3:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car              

Parking G in any of these spaces would violate our Sequence because there would not be a sufficient number of spaces (we need three of them) in which to park the three cars (E, C, and A) that, according to our Sequence, must precede G in some fashion.

(You probably noticed that G also cannot be parked in space 4 because, according to Rule 4, only E or D can be parked there.  But, since this is true for every other car that is not E or D, let’s not cross out space 4 for G like we did for spaces 1, 2, and 3, because that means we would have to do it for every other car that is not E or D.  We don’t have enough space for that, and Rule 4 is sufficient.)

Second, with all of the above information, you can now narrow down the parking possibilities into TWO scenarios: the scenario where E is in space 4 and the scenario where E is not in space 4.

For the first scenario, if E is in space 4 . . .


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E      

. . . we can use our Sequence (E – AC/CA – G) to map out a good portion of the parking order.  We know that A, C, and G must fill out spaces 5, 6, and 7 in some order.  Neither A nor C can be parked in space 7.  So that leaves G for space 7:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E     G

Then, A and C can be parked in spaces 5 or 6 in whatever order:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

It doesn’t matter what order A and C are in so long as they are parked consecutively.  That leaves B, D, and F.  We don’t have any rules that help us predict where those cars would be parked.  The only Rules are 4 and 5.  Rule 4 requires that E or D be parked in space 4.  Since E is parked there in this scenario, we have satisfied Rule 4.  Rule 5 requires that F and G not be parked consecutively.  Since G is parked in space 7 and will be preceded by either A or C, we have satisfied Rule 5.  Nothing else helps us predict where B, D, or F might go.  Since there are several possibilities, we will leave our first scenario as is:


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

For the second scenario, if D (instead of E) is in space 4 . . .


 Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D      

. . . we can again use our Sequence (E – AC/CA – G) to map out a good portion of the parking order.  There are several variables with E.  E could be parked in space 1, 2, or 3, so long as A/C/G are parked in higher-numbered spaces.  So E yields too many possibilities for our purposes right now.  However, we know that A and C must be parked consecutively.  Because D splits up the ordering, there are only two possibilities for consecutive spaces for the A/C combination (spaces 2 and 3 or spaces 5 and 6), since neither A nor C can be parked in either spaces 1 or 7.  Thus, we have two possible scenarios (which we will label Scenario 2 and Scenario 3).  Either A and C are parked in spaces 2 and 3:


 Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car   A/C C/A D      

Or A and C are parked in spaces 5 and 6:


Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A  

In Scenario 2, the only option for E is space 1:


 Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D      

B would then have to be parked in spot 6 since F and G cannot be parked consecutively:


 Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D   B  

Then F and G can be parked in spots 5 and 7 in whatever order:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

That is as far as we can go with Scenario 2, but, as you can see, it does A LOT for us.  As for Scenario 3, the only option for G is space 7:


Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

That leaves B, E, and F for spaces 1, 2, and 3.  No other rules help us predict where to park those remaining cars, so we will leave Scenario 3 as is.

So we have three possible scenarios to work with when we answer the five questions that follow:


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

Finally!  Let’s proceed to the questions!

Questions

Question 1

1. Which of the following could be a possible list of the cars in the order that they are parked during the day?

(A) ACDEFBG
(B) BFAECGD
(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

This question asks which of five parking scenarios is possible.  Thus, four of the five listed in (A) through (E) are not possible.  This is a common question and usually follows the Logic Game as the first question.  It merely requires that you plug in the different rules, eliminate the answer choices that violate the rules, and then, by process of elimination, arrive at the correct answer.

If you recall, we have our three scenarios:


 Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

Let’s look at the first answer choice:

(A) ACDEFBG

Does it violate any rules?  Yes!  A is in space 1.  Our notations above prohibit A from being in space 1.  Thus, answer choice A is incorrect, and we can safely eliminate it:

(A) ACPSTNG
(B) BFAECGD

(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

Let’s look at the next answer choice:

(B) BFAECGD

Does it violate any rules?  Yes!  E is in space 4, so this scenario relates to our Scenario 1:


 Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

In Scenario 1, some combination of A and C must be parked in spaces 5 and 6, and G must be parked in space 7.  However, in our answer choice, G and D are in spaces 6 and 7:

(B) BFAECGD

That arrangement violates our notations above and the Sequence we inferred from the first three rules: E – AC/CA – G.  That Sequence requires that E be parked in a lower-numbered space than A and C.  However, in our answer choice, A is parked in a lower-numbered space than E:

(B) BFAECGD

Thus, answer choice B is incorrect, and we can safely eliminate it.

(B) BFAECGD
(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

Let’s look at answer choice C:

(C) EACDFBG

Does it violate any rules?  It doesn’t look like it!  Let’s walk through it.  Because D is parked in space 4, and F is in space 5, this arrangement implicates our second Scenario:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

The arrangement in answer choice C complies with this Scenario.  E is parked in space 1.  A and C are in spaces 2 and 3.  As mentioned above, D and F are in spaces 4 and 5.  B is in space 6.  Finally, G is in space 7.  Our Sequence isn’t violated because E is parked in a lower-numbered space than A and C, which are parked in lower-numbered spaces than G.  Nor are Rules 4 or 5 violated because D is in space 4, and F and G are not parked consecutively.  Thus, answer choice C is the correct answer!

(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGBLSAT Logic Games

At this point, you could move on to Question 2 and save time.  You don’t have to examine each of the remaining two answers.  Remember that this is a timed exam, and whenever you have a correct answer and are 100% sure that it is correct (as you are here), save time and move on!

For our purposes here, though, let’s look at what is wrong with answer choices D and E.  Answer choice D shows us F and G parked consecutively:

(D) ECADGFB

Thus, it is not correct because that violates Rule 5.

(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

As for answer choice E, neither E nor D are in space 4; A is:

(C) EACDFBG

(E) EFCADGB

Thus, answer choice E is incorrect because it violates Rule 4.

(C) EACDFBG

(E) EFCADGB

So answer choice C as our correct answer for Question 1:

1. Which of the following could be a possible list of the cars in the order that they are parked during the day?

(A) ACDEFBG
(B) BFAECGD
(C) EACDFBG
(D) ECADGFB
(E) EFCADGB

Now on to Question 2 . . .

Question 2

2. If car A is parked in the third space, then which of the following must be true?

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.
(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Unlike Question 1, which asked us which of five parking scenarios was possible, Question 2 introduces an additional rule or condition (“A is parked in the third space”) and asks which of five parking possibilities is correct in light of that new rule.  To answer this question, we add this additional rule to the mix and then, before considering any of the answers, map out the rest of the parking order in our diagram.

First, let’s write in our additional rule:


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car     A        

Sequence 1: E – AC/CA – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4.

Rule 5: GF, FG


Next, let’s map out the rest of the parking order.  This will help us narrow down our possibilities and, thus, eliminate answer choices.

In mapping out the rest of the parking order, you could go through the Sequence and then Rules 4 and 5 and then fill in the rest of the order.  However, we can save you a few seconds and perhaps a few minutes.  Remember our Scenarios?


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

Which Scenario above could have A in space 3?  Scenario 2!  Neither Scenarios 1 or 3 could have A in space 3.  Thus, Scenario 2 maps out the rest of the order for us:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E C A D F/G B G/F

The only variables left are F and G, which can be parked in spaces 5 or 7.  We don’t have enough information to be able to determine where they go exactly, but that doesn’t matter.  We have just saved a ton of time by having Scenario 2 in our back pocket!  Let’s look at the answer choices:

2. If car A is parked in the third space, then which of the following must be true?

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.
(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Notice the question asks “which of the following must be true?”  Thus, we must find the answer choice that is true under every circumstance.  We are not looking for something that could be true.  The question asks what must be true.  Let’s begin with answer choice A:

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.

That is false because D is in space 4.  Thus, answer choice A is incorrect:

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.
(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Let’s move to answer choice B:

(B) C is parked in the first space.

That is false as well because E is in space 1.  So answer choice B is incorrect:

(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Answer choice C:

(C) B is parked in the sixth space.

B is indeed in space 6 and must be for this order to work.  So answer choice C is the correct answer!

(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Again, we could move on here to Question 3 because we are sure answer choice C is the correct answer.  But, for our purposes here, let’s examine the remaining two answers.  First, answer choice D:

(D) G is parked in the seventh space.

G could be parked in space 7.  But it doesn’t have to be:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E C A D F/G B G/F

There is a version of Scenario 2 where G is parked in space 5:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E C A D G B F

Thus, because G doesn’t have to be in space 7, answer choice D is incorrect:

(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Let’s look at answer choice E:

(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

Like with answer choice D, F could be parked in space 5.  But it doesn’t have to be:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E C A D F/G B G/F

There is a version of Scenario 2 where F is parked in space 7:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E C A D G B F

Thus, because F doesn’t have to be in space 5, answer choice E is incorrect:

(C) B is parked in the sixth space.

(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

That leaves answer choice C as our correct answer:

2. If car A is parked in the third space, then which of the following must be true?

(A) E is parked in the fourth space.
(B) C is parked in the first space.
(C) B is parked in the sixth space.
(D) G is parked in the seventh space.
(E) F is parked in the fifth space.

On to Question 3 . . .

Question 3

3. Which of the following could be true?

(A) F is parked in the sixth space.
(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

Notice right away that we are out of the “must be true” world and into the merely probable “could be true” world.  A difference, for sure, but not more difficult.  Because Question 3 does not provide us with any additional rules or conditions, the fastest approach here will be to plug each of these answer choices into our three Scenarios and apply our Sequence and Rules, and see what works (like we did, in part, with Question 1).  If an answer doesn’t work at all, it is incorrect.  If it could work in any of the Scenarios, it’s the correct answer.

To recap, here are our three Scenarios:


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

Let’s start with answer choice A:

(A) F is parked in the sixth space.

Could F be parked in space 6?  No!  That could never happen.  In Scenarios 1 and 3, either A or C must be parked in space 6.  In Scenario 2, B must go in space 6.  So answer choice A is incorrect:

(A) F is parked in the sixth space.
(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

What about answer choice B?

(B) C is parked in the fifth space.

C could be parked in space 5 in either Scenario 1 or Scenario 3.  So answer choice B is our correct answer!

(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

For the sake of this analysis, let’s examine the remaining three answer choices, beginning with answer choice C:

(C) E is parked in the seventh space.

That violates our Sequence and our notations, so answer choice C is incorrect:

(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

What about answer choice D?

(D) A is parked in the first space.

That doesn’t work either because it violates our Sequence and notations.  Answer choice D is incorrect:

(B) C is parked in the fifth space.

(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

Answer choice E?

(E) G is parked in the third space.

That violates our Sequence and our notations as well, so answer choice E is incorrect:

(B) C is parked in the fifth space.

(E) G is parked in the third space.

That leaves answer choice B as our correct answer:

3. Which of the following could be true?

(A) F is parked in the sixth space.
(B) C is parked in the fifth space.
(C) E is parked in the seventh space.
(D) A is parked in the first space.
(E) G is parked in the third space.

On to Question 4!

Question 4

4. If B is parked in the third space, then each of the following could be true EXCEPT:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.
(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Like Question 2, Question 4 introduces an additional rule or condition.  It then asks which of five parking orders is false.  Because it posits that “each of the following [five answers] could be true,” by prefacing the answers with “EXCEPT,” it effectively asks which of those five answers cannot be true.

So, as we did with Question 2, let’s add our new rule (B parked in the third space):


 

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car     B        

Sequence 1: E – AC/CA – G

Rule 4: E or D in space 4.

Rule 5: GF, FG


Like we did with Question 2, we need to map out the rest of the parking order if we can.  To do that, let’s look at our Scenarios:


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       E A/C C/A G

Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

 Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car       D A/C C/A G

Which Scenario above could have B in space 3?  Scenarios 1 and 3!  Those Scenarios map out the rest of the possible parking orders for us:


Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car     B E A/C C/A G

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car     B D A/C C/A G

The remaining cars (D and F in Scenario 1, and E and F in Scenario 3) could go in spaces 1 and 2 in whatever order, as follows:


 

Scenario 1

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car D/F F/D B E A/C C/A G

Scenario 3

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E/F F/E B D A/C C/A G

Let’s now go back to the question:

4. If B is parked in the third space, then each of the following could be true EXCEPT:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.
(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Let’s start with answer choice A:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.

A could be parked in space 5 in both Scenarios.  So answer choice A is incorrect:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.
(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

What about answer choice B?

(B) G is parked in the sixth space.

G cannot be parked in space 6 under any circumstances.  In both Scenarios, it must be parked in space 7.  Thus, answer choice B is our correct answer!

(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Let’s examine the remaining answer choices, beginning with answer choice C:

(C) D is parked in the fourth space.

D could be parked in space 4 in Scenario 3.  So, answer choice C is incorrect:

(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Let’s look at answer choice D:

(D) F is parked in the first space.

F could be parked in space 1 in both Scenarios.  So answer choice D is incorrect:

(B) G is parked in the sixth space.

(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Now, answer choice E:

(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

C could be parked in space 6 in both Scenarios.  So answer choice E is incorrect:

(B) G is parked in the sixth space.

(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

That leaves answer choice B as our correct answer:

4. If B is parked in the third space, then each of the following could be true EXCEPT:

(A) A is parked in the fifth space.
(B) G is parked in the sixth space.
(C) D is parked in the fourth space.
(D) F is parked in the first space.
(E) C is parked in the sixth space.

Finally, on to Question 5 . . .

Question 5

5. If F is parked in the seventh space, then which of the following must be parked in the first space?

(A) B
(B) A
(C) D
(D) C
(E) E

Like Questions 2 and 4, this one introduces an additional rule for us (F parked in space 7).  Let’s cut to the chase: Which of our Scenarios could feature F in space 7?

You guessed it!  Scenario 2!


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D F/G B G/F

Let’s reconfigure Scenario 2 so that F is in space 7:


Scenario 2

Space 1(C) (G) (A) 2(G) 3(G) 4(E or D) 5(E) 6(E) 7(E) (A) (C)
Car E A/C C/A D G B F

We can’t do anything with A and C, so we will leave them as is.  Let’s move on to the answer choices:

5. If F is parked in the seventh space, then which of the following must be parked in the fifth space?

(A) B
(B) A
(C) D
(D) C
(E) E

The question is simple: Which car must be in space 1?  If you look at our Scenario above, E must be in space 1.  No other car can be parked in space 1.  Accordingly, the correct answer choice is answer choice E:

5. If F is parked in the seventh space, then which of the following must be parked in the first space?

(A) B
(B) A
(C) D
(D) C
(E) E

The method above represents the best way for you to approach LSAT Logic Games.  You must diagram the Game so that you can process and understand the information it provides.  When doing so, infer as much as possible from the information given.  Then, use your diagram to answer the questions.  Remember: It’s no different than a puzzle, and all the information you need is right in front of you.

23 OCT / 2014 0

LSAT Freedom Inbox – October 23, 2014

As we’ve mentioned before, here at LSAT Freedom, we get a lot of email.  Students, potential students, former students, and even random visitors to our website have questions.  They send us questions by email (at info@LSATFreedom.com or support@LSATFreedom.com), and we take the time to answer them.  These questions and our answers are often informative and very helpful to others.  So we post these questions and answers from time to time in a blog article titled “LSAT Freedom Inbox.”

In this post, we give you a peek at our email inbox.  We reproduce three questions we receive by email and provide answers to those questions.  In some instances, we have modified the questions and answers, in part, to appeal to our readers’ more general concerns on this blog.  Some of these questions and answers will be short; others will be long.  Either way, the information is helpful to YOU, our readers.  Just to be clear: these are real questions from real readers.

LSAT Freedom Inbox – October 23, 2014

Q: I just got my score.  It’s a 154.  I am not sure whether I should retake the LSAT.  Do you have any advice you can give me on that?Retake the LSAT

-Tatiana

LSAT Freedom: We certainly can!  When LSAT scores are released, many people often wonder whether they should retake the LSAT.  If you didn’t hit your target score or don’t think the score you received reflects your potential, whether or not to retake the LSAT is a question worth considering.  Like any other decision, whether to retake the LSAT has its positives and negatives.  It’s not an easy decision, and it requires assessing several factors.  Fortunately,  in the past, we compiled two lists of the factors you should consider, and that can help you decide.  Here are 4 reasons why you should retake the LSAT, and here are 5 reasons why you should NOT retake the LSAT.  It’s always helpful to look at both sides of an issue.  Hopefully, these lists will guide you towards the right choice!

Q: What should I be doing with LSAT reading comprehension?  Should I try and memorize as much information as I can from the passage and then answer the questions?  

-Ronnie

LSAT Freedom: Great question, and one that often comes up with an often-forgotten section on the LSAT.  On the LSAT Reading Comprehension section, you should not try and memorize the passage.  In just a span of a few minutes, that is impossible to do.  Rather, when reading, you should focus on underlining key information.  This underlining creates markers or guideposts you can use later on to find relevant information when you answer the questions.  Here is a quick explanation of how to approach LSAT Reading Comprehension passages.  As far as what to underline, here is a list of the items of information you should make a note of when reading these passages.

Q: Hi, I registered for the February 2015 LSAT.  How far in advance should I begin studying?  I work part-time, and I am also in school.

-Daryl

LSAT Freedom: Daryl, you’re in luck.  We recently threw up a quick video in which we answered that very question.  In short, determine the number of hours needed, and then allocate those hours across your day-to-day schedule.  Hope this helps!  

Got a question you want answered?  Email us at info@LSATFreedom.com!  Your question and the answer may show up on our blog!

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